Things you might not know about MEAT:

The word meat comes from the Old English word mete, which referred to food in general. The term is related to mad in Danish, mat in Swedish and Norwegian, and matur in Icelandic, which also mean ‘food’. The word “mete” also exists in Old Frisian to denote important food, differentiating it from “swiets” (sweets) and “dierfied” (animal feed).

Various forms of imitation meat have been created for people wishing to reduce or eliminate meat consumption for health, environmental, or ethical considerations, but who still wish to taste the flavor and texture of meat. They are typically some form of processed soybean, (tofu, tempeh), but they can also be based on wheat gluten or even fungus (quern).

One definition that refers to meat as not including fish developed over the past few hundred years and has religious influences. The distinction between fish and “meat” is codified by the Jewish dietary law of kashrut, regarding the mixing of milk and meat, which does not forbid the mixing of milk and fish. Modern Jewish legal practice (halakha) on kashrut classifies the flesh of both mammals and birds as “meat”; fish are considered to be parve, neither meat nor a dairy food. The Catholic dietary restriction on “meat” on Fridays also does not apply to the cooking and eating of fish.

And now: on with the cooking.

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